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John Bale and Religious Conversion in Reformation England

John Bale and Religious Conversion in Reformation England PDF Author: Oliver Wort
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781138662193
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 224
Book Description
Focusing on the life and work of the evangelical reformer John Bale (1485-1563), Wort presents a study of conversion in the sixteenth century.

John Bale and Religious Conversion in Reformation England

John Bale and Religious Conversion in Reformation England PDF Author: Oliver Wort
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781138662193
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 224
Book Description
Focusing on the life and work of the evangelical reformer John Bale (1485-1563), Wort presents a study of conversion in the sixteenth century.

John Bale and Religious Conversion in Reformation England

John Bale and Religious Conversion in Reformation England PDF Author: Oliver Wort
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317319966
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 224
Book Description
Focusing on the life and work of the evangelical reformer John Bale (1485–1563), Wort presents a study of conversion in the sixteenth century.

Reformation, Religious Culture and Print in Early Modern Europe

Reformation, Religious Culture and Print in Early Modern Europe PDF Author: Arthur der Weduwen
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004515305
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 348
Book Description
This collection of essays, commissioned in honour of Andrew Pettegree, presents original contributions on the Reformation, communication and the book in early modern Europe. Together, the essays reflect on Pettegree’s ground-breaking influence on these fields, and offer a comprehensive survey of the state of current scholarship.

The Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature in Britain, 4 Volume Set

The Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature in Britain, 4 Volume Set PDF Author: Sian Echard
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118396987
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 2102
Book Description
Bringing together scholarship on multilingual and intercultural medieval Britain like never before, The Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature in Britain comprises over 600 authoritative entries spanning key figures, contexts and influences in the literatures of Britain from the fifth to the sixteenth centuries. A uniquely multilingual and intercultural approach reflecting the latest scholarship, covering the entire medieval period and the full tapestry of literary languages comprises over 600 authoritative yet accessible entries on key figures, texts, critical debates, methodologies, cultural and isitroical contexts, and related terminology Represents all the literatures of the British Isles including Old and Middle English, Early Scots, Anglo-Norman, the Norse, Latin and French of Britain, and the Celtic Literatures of Wales, Ireland, Scotland and Cornwall Boasts an impressive chronological scope, covering the period from the Saxon invasions to the fifth century to the transition to the Early Modern Period in the sixteenth Covers the material remains of Medieval British literature, including manuscripts and early prints, literary sites and contexts of production, performance and reception as well as highlighting narrative transformations and intertextual links during the period

Staging Harmony

Staging Harmony PDF Author: Katherine Steele Brokaw
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501705911
Category : Drama
Languages : en
Pages : 293
Book Description
In Staging Harmony, Katherine Steele Brokaw reveals how the relationship between drama, music, and religious change across England’s long sixteenth century moved religious discourse to more moderate positions. It did so by reproducing the complex personal attachments, nostalgic overtones, and bodily effects that allow performed music to evoke the feeling, if not always the reality, of social harmony. Brokaw demonstrates how theatrical music from the late fifteenth to the early seventeenth centuries contributed to contemporary discourses on the power and morality of music and its proper role in religious life, shaping the changes made to church music as well as people’s reception of those changes. In representing social, affective, and religious life in all its intricacy, and in unifying auditors in shared acoustic experiences, staged musical moments suggested the value of complexity, resolution, and compromise rather than oversimplified, absolutist binaries worth killing or dying for. The theater represented the music of the church’s present and past. By bringing medieval and early Tudor drama into conversation with Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, Brokaw uncovers connections and continuities across diverse dramatic forms and demonstrates the staying power of musical performance traditions. In analyzing musical practices and discourses, theological debates, devotional practices, and early staging conditions, Brokaw offers new readings of well-known plays (Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, Shakespeare’s The Tempest and The Winter’s Tale) as well as Tudor dramas by playwrights including John Bale, Nicholas Udall, and William Wager.

Dissent and Authority in Early Modern Ireland

Dissent and Authority in Early Modern Ireland PDF Author: Jane Wong
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1000011968
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 175
Book Description
Dissent and Authority in Early Modern Ireland: The English Problem from Bale to Shakespeare examines the problems that beset the Tudor administration of Ireland through a range of selected 16th century English narratives. This book is primarily concerned with the period between 1541 and 1603. This bracket provides a framework that charts early modern Irish history from the constitutional change of the island from lordship to kingdom to the end of the conquest in 1603. The mounting impetus to bring Ireland to a "complete" conquest during these years has, quite naturally, led critics to associate England’s reform strategies with Irish Otherness. The preoccupation with this discourse of difference is also perceived as the "Irish Problem," a blanket term broadly used to describe just about every aspect of Irishness incompatible with the English imperialist ideologies. The term stresses everything that is "wrong" with the Irish nation—Ireland was a problem to be resolved. This book takes a different approach towards the "Irish Problem." Instead of rehashing the English government’s complaints of the recalcitrant Irish and the long struggle to impose royal authority in Ireland, I posit that the "Irish Problem" was very much shaped and developed by a larger "English Problem," namely English dissent within the English government. The discussions in this book focuse on the ways in which English writers articulated their knowledge and anxieties of the "English Problem" in sixteenth-century literary and historical narratives. This book reappraises the limitations of the "Irish Problem," and argues that the crown’s failure to control dissent within its own ranks was as detrimental to the conquest as the "Irish Problem," if not more so, and finally, it attempts to demonstrate how dissent translate into governance and conquest in early modern Ireland.

The Oxford History of Life Writing: Volume 2. Early Modern

The Oxford History of Life Writing: Volume 2. Early Modern PDF Author: Alan Stewart
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191506990
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 480
Book Description
The Oxford History of Life-Writing: Volume2. Early Modern explores life-writing in England between 1500 and 1700, and argues that this was a period which saw remarkable innovations in biography, autobiography, and diary-keeping that laid the foundations for our modern life-writing. The challenges wrought by the upheavals and the sixteenth-century English Reformation and seventeenth-century Civil Wars moulded British and early American life-writing in unique and lasting ways. While classical and medieval models continued to exercise considerable influence, new forms began to challenge them. The English Reformation banished the saints' lives that dominated the writings of medieval Catholicism, only to replace them with new lives of Protestant martyrs. Novel forms of self-accounting came into existence: from the daily moral self-accounting dictated by strands of Calvinism, to the daily financial self-accounting modelled on the new double-entry book-keeping. This volume shows how the most ostensibly private journals were circulated to build godly communities; how women found new modes of recording and understanding their disrupted lives; how men started to compartmentalize their lives for public and private consumption. The volume doesn't intend to present a strict chronological progression from the medieval to the modern, nor to suggest the triumphant rise of the fact-based historical biography. Instead, it portrays early modern England as a site of multiple, sometimes conflicting possibilities for life-writing, all of which have something to teach us about how the period understood both the concept of a 'life' and what it mean to 'write' a life.

Forms of faith

Forms of faith PDF Author: Jonathan Baldo
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 1526107171
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 280
Book Description
This book explores the role of literature as a means of mediating religious conflict in early modern England. Marking a new stage in the ‘religious turn’ that generated vigorous discussion of the changes and conflicts brought about by the Reformation, it unites new historicist readings with an interest in the ideological significance of aesthetic form. It proceeds from the assumption that confessional differences did not always erupt into hostilities but that people also had to arrange themselves with divided loyalties – between the old faith and the new, between religious and secular interests, between officially sanctioned and privately held beliefs. What role might literature have played here? Can we conceive of literary representations as possible sites of de-escalation? Do different discursive, aesthetic, or social contexts inflect or deflect the demands of religious loyalties? Such questions open a new perspective on post-Reformation English culture and literature.

Female Piety and the Catholic Reformation in France

Female Piety and the Catholic Reformation in France PDF Author: Jennifer Hillman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317317823
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 273
Book Description
Hillman presents a fascinating account of the role that women played during the Catholic Reformation in France. She reconstructs the devotional practices of a network of powerful women showing how they reconciled Catholic piety with their roles as part of an aristocratic elite, challenging the view that the Catholic Reformation was a male concern.

Priestly Resistance to the Early Reformation in Germany

Priestly Resistance to the Early Reformation in Germany PDF Author: Jourden Travis Moger
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131731848X
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 234
Book Description
Moger’s study explores the personal experience of those who found themselves on the ‘losing side’ of the Reformation. Using the private diary of Catholic priest, Wolfgang Königstein, Moger discusses the early years of Protestantism and its effects on the lives of German Catholics.