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The Civil War Dead and American Modernity

The Civil War Dead and American Modernity PDF Author: Ian Finseth
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190848340
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 352
Book Description
The Civil War Dead and American Modernity offers a fundamental rethinking of the cultural importance of the American Civil War dead. Tracing their representational afterlife across a massive array of historical, visual, and literary documents from 1861 to 1914, Ian Finseth maintains that the war dead played a central, complex, and paradoxical role in how Americans experienced and understood the modernization of the United States. From eyewitness accounts of battle to photographs and paintings, and from full-dress histories of the war to fictional narratives, Finseth shows that the dead circulated through American cultural life in ways that we have not fully appreciated, and that require an expanded range of interpretive strategies to understand. While individuals grieved and relinquished their own loved ones, the collective Civil War dead, Finseth argues, came to form a kind of symbolic currency that informed Americans' melancholic relationship to their own past. Amid the turbulence of the postbellum era, as the United States embarked decisively upon its technological, geopolitical, and intellectual modernity, the dead provided an illusion of coherence, intelligibility, and continuity in the national self. At the same time, they seemed to represent a traumatic break in history and the loss of a simpler world, and their meanings could never be completely contained by the political discourse that surrounded them. Reconstructing the formal, rhetorical, and ideological strategies by which postwar American society reimagined, and continues to reimagine, the Civil War dead, Finseth also shows that a strain of critical thought was alert to this dynamic from the very years of the war itself. The Civil War Dead and American Modernity is at once a study of the politics of mortality, the disintegration of American Victorianism, and the role of visual and literary art in both forming and undermining social consensus.

The Civil War Dead and American Modernity

The Civil War Dead and American Modernity PDF Author: Ian Finseth
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190848340
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 352
Book Description
The Civil War Dead and American Modernity offers a fundamental rethinking of the cultural importance of the American Civil War dead. Tracing their representational afterlife across a massive array of historical, visual, and literary documents from 1861 to 1914, Ian Finseth maintains that the war dead played a central, complex, and paradoxical role in how Americans experienced and understood the modernization of the United States. From eyewitness accounts of battle to photographs and paintings, and from full-dress histories of the war to fictional narratives, Finseth shows that the dead circulated through American cultural life in ways that we have not fully appreciated, and that require an expanded range of interpretive strategies to understand. While individuals grieved and relinquished their own loved ones, the collective Civil War dead, Finseth argues, came to form a kind of symbolic currency that informed Americans' melancholic relationship to their own past. Amid the turbulence of the postbellum era, as the United States embarked decisively upon its technological, geopolitical, and intellectual modernity, the dead provided an illusion of coherence, intelligibility, and continuity in the national self. At the same time, they seemed to represent a traumatic break in history and the loss of a simpler world, and their meanings could never be completely contained by the political discourse that surrounded them. Reconstructing the formal, rhetorical, and ideological strategies by which postwar American society reimagined, and continues to reimagine, the Civil War dead, Finseth also shows that a strain of critical thought was alert to this dynamic from the very years of the war itself. The Civil War Dead and American Modernity is at once a study of the politics of mortality, the disintegration of American Victorianism, and the role of visual and literary art in both forming and undermining social consensus.

Seeking the Region in American Literature and Culture

Seeking the Region in American Literature and Culture PDF Author: Robert Jackson
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807130629
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 172
Book Description
Regionalism often evokes provinciality and an affiliation with minor literary genres, but Robert Jackson shows that region is an integral part of American identity, providing grounding for major independent voices. Jackson offers a new critical model of region that contributes to literary and cultural study across a wide range of topics. He addresses American literature since the Civil War with particular attention to Mark Twain, William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, and Toni Morrison. In advancing their own diverse aesthetic and social agendas -- reactionary and progressive, theological and secular, gender-based, race-based, and above all, dissident -- these writers, Jackson argues, articulate some of the most perceptive and innovative expressions of the American region in the literary history of the United States. According to Jackson, the region transcends both rigidly defined spatial categories -- the South of slavery, the North of freedom, the West of unlimited possibility -- and derivative cultural connotations of local color to reveal subtle and powerful insights. He provides a regional reading of Twain's greatest novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and a meaningful new interpretation of the work and its place in the American canon. He explores Faulkner's obsession with regional identity and places the Mississippian's work in problematic relation to the Depression-era Nashville Agrarian movement. O'Connor, searching for a critical vocabulary to confront mainstream American literature, religion, and gender, transforms the region from a hothouse of sentimentality into a sharp, deadly weapon in her short fiction. Morrison's brilliant appropriation of region enables her to fashion an aesthetic that is both race-conscious and endowed with revisionist agency; through the region she imagines a new grounding for American identity. Jackson illuminates the importance of rethinking long-established assumptions and demonstrates the vast potential of the region in critical considerations of American literature and culture. Even as he devotes significant attention to realism, modernism, southern literature, and African American literature, he speaks to a wide range of fields in American Cultural studies.

Nations, Markets, and War

Nations, Markets, and War PDF Author: Nicholas Greenwood Onuf
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813925028
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 362
Book Description
The limits of history -- Liberal society -- Civilized nations -- Moral persons -- Nation making -- Adam Smith, moral historian -- National destinies -- War and peace in the New World -- The North and the nation -- The South and the nation.

Victorian America and the Civil War

Victorian America and the Civil War PDF Author: Anne C. Rose
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521410816
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 324
Book Description
Victorian America and the Civil War examines the relationships between American Victorian culture and the Civil War. The author argues that at the heart of American Victorian culture was Romanticism, a secular quest to answer questions previously settled by traditional religion. In examining the biographies of seventy-five Americans who lived in the antebellum and Civil War eras, elements of disequilibrium, passion and intellectual excitement are explored in contrast to the traditional view of Victorian self-control and moral assurance. The Civil War is shown to be a central event in the cultural life of the American Victorians, which both was an environment for the resolution of their questions and a place where their values and aspirations could be reshaped.

A Gallant Little Army

A Gallant Little Army PDF Author: Timothy D. Johnson
Publisher: Modern War Studies (Hardcover)
ISBN:
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 365
Book Description
The first book-length study of one of America's greatest military campaigns and triumphs, led by Winfield Scott--one of America's greatest generals. Shines a spotlight on the campaign that became a significant proving ground for West Point-educated officers and a formative combat school for many of the Civil War's most prominent generals.

Music of the Civil War Era

Music of the Civil War Era PDF Author: Steven Cornelius
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 0313320810
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 295
Book Description
Examines the popular songs of the Civil War and those who composed and played them, includes biographies of musicians of the era and a dictionary of Civil War music.

Dead Time

Dead Time PDF Author: Elissa Marder
Publisher: Cultural Memory in the Present
ISBN: 9780804740715
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 222
Book Description
This book explores how modernity gives rise to temporal disorders when time cannot be assimilated and integrated into the realm of lived experience. It turns to Baudelaire and Flaubert in order to derive insights into the many temporal disorders (such as trauma, addiction, and fetishism) that pervade contemporary culture.

War and the 20th Century

War and the 20th Century PDF Author: Christopher Coker
Publisher: Potomac Books Incorporated
ISBN:
Category : War
Languages : en
Pages : 304
Book Description
War has been the defining theme of the 20th century. It has dominated our imagination; it has influenced our political language; it has shaped and determined our view of history. This study sets out to look at the modern consciousness and war in terms of a number of themes: our view of the 20th century; our understanding of modernity; our attitude to the meaning or meaninglessness of history; our trust or distrust of science; our psychological presuppositions. Towards the end of the book the author also looks at the often tragic nature of the encounter between the western and non-western worlds. Throughout the study the discussion is anchored to several seminal themes or works drawn from a wide spectrum of American and European authors in the fields of literature and philosophy. Western culture has been deeply influenced - both consciously and unconsciously by its experience of conflict, in particular the two World Wars and the Cold War that followed them. This study illustrates why, in the course of the 20th century, war became the accredited theme of modern life.

Modernism, History and the First World War

Modernism, History and the First World War PDF Author: Fellow of Clare Hall and an Affiliated Lecturer in the Faculty of English Trudi Tate
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN:
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 216
Book Description
This is a study of the relationship between modernist fiction, World War One and cultural history: how did modernist writers bear witness to the trauma of war? Drawing upon medical journals, newspapers, propaganda, military histories and other writings of the day, this text re-reads writers such as Woolf, HD, Ford, Faulkner, Kipling and Lawrence alongside the fiction and memoirs of soldiers and nurses who served in the war.

Vicksburg's Long Shadow

Vicksburg's Long Shadow PDF Author: Christopher Waldrep
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Pub Incorporated
ISBN:
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 344
Book Description
During the hottest days of the summer of 1863, while the nation's attention was focused on a small town in Pennsylvania known as Gettysburg, another momentous battle was being fought along the banks of the Mississippi. In the longest single campaign of the war, the siege of Vicksburg left 19,000 dead and wounded on both sides, gave the Union Army control of the Mississippi, and left the Confederacy cut in half. In this highly-anticipated new work, Christopher Waldrep takes a fresh look at how the Vicksburg campaign was fought and remembered. He begins with a gripping account of the battle, deftly recounting the experiences of African-American troops fighting for the Union. Waldrep shows how as the scars of battle faded, the memory of the war was shaped both by the Northerners who controlled the battlefield and by the legacies of race and slavery that played out over the decades that followed.